New Tool Thread

honeykeeper

New Member
[quote name='mcginkleschmidt' timestamp='1310230620' post='161262']

DC, is this the first you've seen of the post I did last year? The concrete line pumping company I used, Jensen's Line Pumping, has truck mounted line pumps but for the size and duration of my job, 7 cubic yards, anything more was overkill. They had had some problems with the pump they used and they had worked on it the day before and they wanted to test it on my job.. They drove a 2nd pump, a truck mounted one, and parked it in the street to take over in case the smaller pump became problematic. The small pump worked flawlessly and never hiccupped during about the 40 minute job.



We used a 3 inch hose with the line pump for pumping a 4,000 psi pump mix with a maximum rock size of about 3/4 inch. The rule of thumb for pump-mix concrete is the rock size should be no more than about 1/4 the pipe diameter. I had a choice of using either 2, 2 1/2, 3 or 4 inch lines but the smaller lines are mostly used for pea-gravel or sand-only concrete mixes . The larger 4 inch line is much heavier and more difficult to manhandle so the 3 inch line was the most practical choice.



I ordered my concrete with a rather stiff 2" slump and we added superplasticizer on the jobsite to give a free-flowing mix with a reduced use of water. The superplasticizer helps to settle the concrete in the forms and around the rebar to minimize voids and honey-combing. I used an electric concrete vibrator that I purchased from Harbor Freight to additionally settle the concrete and to remove the air bubbles. The superplasticizer effect lasts for only about 45 minutes before the concrete in the truck reverts again to its low-slump state, so one needs to work fast.



DC, in the past when you used a truck mounted concrete pump, did you mostly use a truck-mounted line pump or did you use a concrete boom-pump, or sometimes both?



Addendum: DC, the curved forms were made by cutting 3/4" plywood to make the horizontal top and bottom rails that follow the curved footing radius. By gluing and clamping two of the curved 3/4" plywood rails together, you essentially have made a curved. 2x4. The straight vertical 2x4s are placed and nailed between the two curved bottom and top rail 2x4s pf the form. The "skin" of the curved forms were made by gluing with Gorilla Glue and nailing together 3 sheets of 1/4" plywood sheets.



Initially, I was planning to "manufacture" the horizontal walers using the same method I used for the bottom and top rails of the curved forms when I had an epiphany. In the curved portion of the forms, I decided instead to build and build "vertical" walers in the same way the vertical 2x4s are used in the curved forms. This method would be more than adequate for holding and forming concrete that is only 8 inches thick and 2 feet tall. Together with the snaptie system I was using, this method would probably be adequate for build curved walls that are 8-10 feet tall but this discovery and change saved me a lot of work and grief over that of cutting and building curved horizontal walers that follow the same profile of that in the straight portion of the wall forms and waler support system.

[/quote]





One heck of a great job mc.......can't wait to see the stoned finish..........do post some pics. when you can.



Did your neighbor share the expense with you?..........
..........that's yet another advantage of living on top of a mountain top......




I would have used bamboo.........so it could drink the water and spread into your neighbors yard forever..........and save a ton of money!.......and your back......and your tools........
 

honeykeeper

New Member
I finally replaced the last of the original grade B deck boards........

When it comes to laying deck boards or paneling....the "Bo Wrench" enables one man or woman to squeeze the planks good-and-tight..........and the adjustable joist clamp handles much more than just a 2x...






It's reversible so you can push or pull to squeeze boards tight.



Always use #10 x 3.5" coated deck screws (predrill with a 1/8" bit) to lay new 5/4 deck boards and 45° the joints.........not flush butt joints.......
.......and use vinyl flashing..........not aluminium.





and now for a cold glass of Pinot Grigio.....home made that is....




This time I'm going to paint the decks "Sand Tone" to "keep" them cool in the summer and reflect light in when the Sun is low to the south in the winter....
 

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honeykeeper

New Member
Rockewell SoniCrafter Oscillating Milti-Tool.........RK5101K $135.99.



Bought it on Friday and tried it on Saturday.....DOA............Argh..
.......will be swapping it in the morning. Murphy got me......should have tested it out.




I have used several of these oscillating tools and love the versatility............like precision plunge-cutting, cutting, sanding, grinding.







[media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aXqJa-tJTgo[/media]



[media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m3Ow2TbvWdM&feature=related[/media]





[media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FosLaHo7zAE&NR=1[/media]
 

mcginkleschmidt

Active Member
[quote name='honeykeeper' timestamp='1310931201' post='161324']

Rockewell SoniCrafter Oscillating Milti-Tool.........RK5101K



Bought it on Friday and tried it on Saturday.....DOA............Argh..
.......will be swapping it in the morning. Murphy got me......should have tested it out.




I have used several of these oscillating tools and love the versatility............like precision plunge-cutting.



[/quote]



Back perhaps 20 years or so ago, I purchased the Fein MSX 636-1 Sander, now called the Multimaster. My Fein is the earlier version with a fixed speed of 20,000 oscillations/min. When Fein renamed the tool, Multimaster, they changed to the variable speed model. I had to buy a star adapter to fit the older model since the new tools wont fit on the older Fein version without the star adapter.



My Fein sander is one of the more expensive tools I've ever bought but it has proven to be one of the best and most useful. Before posting, I searched around and found the prices to be a good bit less that earlier, probably because the Fein patent expired a few years ago.



Go buy yourself the original, the Fein Multimaster Keeps, you'll be glad you did.



Addendum: Hold the presses! I just found a reference to the Fein Multimaster, and I haven't confirmed it, but someone made the statement that the Germans have transferred the manufacture of the Multimaster to China but are still asking for top German prices for it. If this is true, then tread carefully and become informed when buying.
 

honeykeeper

New Member
[quote name='mcginkleschmidt' timestamp='1310932819' post='161325']

Back perhaps 20 years or so ago, I purchased the Fein MSX 636-1 Sander, now called the Multimaster. My Fein is the earlier version with a fixed speed of 20,000 oscillations/min. When Fein renamed the tool, Multimaster, they changed to the variable speed model. I had to buy a star adapter to fit the older model since the new tools wont fit on the older Fein version without the star adapter.



My Fein sander is one of the more expensive tools I've ever bought but it has proven to be one of the best and most useful. Before posting, I searched around and found the prices to be a good bit less that earlier, probably because the Fein patent expired a few years ago.



Go buy yourself the original, the Fein Multimaster Keeps, you'll be glad you did.



Addendum: Hold the presses! I just found a reference to the Fein Multimaster, and I haven't confirmed it, but someone made the statement that the Germans have transferred the manufacture of the Multimaster to China but are still asking for top German prices for it. If this is true, then tread carefully and become informed when buying.

[/quote]





The on/off switch feels weak.....I'm not about to take it apart when the dealer is just 6 miles away so we will see what happens when I bring it back.



Here's your Fein..I like the quick blade change feature.......



[media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5HsRixAmF7Y[/media]
 

mcginkleschmidt

Active Member
[quote name='honeykeeper' timestamp='1310935559' post='161327']

The on/off switch feels weak.....I'm not about to take it apart when the dealer is just 6 miles away so we will see what happens when I bring it back.



Here's your Fein..I like the quick blade change feature.......



[/quote]



Nope, that's not my Fein. My Fein detail sander is the MSx 636-1 that was either the original or the next to the original tool version. The business end of my tool is metal without any paint on it and the attachment method is totally manually fitted. The attachments are fitted through a round hole and uses an Allen wrench, not the quick method of the newer models. I have an star adapter that allows the newer type fittings and accessories since the round hole attachments cannot be purchased any longer.



Here is what my Fein tool looks like: http://www.titanspot.com/Titan/index.php?showtopic=501&view=findpost&p=15444
 

honeykeeper

New Member
As I suspected the on/off switch was defective on the SoniCrafter.......the dealer swapped it out for another new tool in the box and all is well. I bought the extra bevel washer, screw and allan key for $6.99 just in case any parts get dropped or lost as the video review mentioned.



Today I used the tool to plunge cut some wood on a door jamb that was kicked-in at an apartment I manage. The surgical plunge cut was easy and I also used the metal cutting accessory to cut some nails out of the way deep in the wood with no problem at all. This saved a lot of chisel and hammer work.



This tool handles great and feels very comfortable, strong and not too noisy. I found the best price at ToolCity of ~$119 but I'm glad to have purchased it locally for just a little more and to have been able to swap it out verses sending it back to an online vendor.



I highly recommend the SoniCrafter.......time will tell and I will check in with input as I use it more.........
 

mcginkleschmidt

Active Member
[quote name='honeykeeper' timestamp='1311798907' post='161415']

Tried some long cuts in sh!trock with the SoniCrafter today.....no problems and less dust....that's a good thang....


[/quote]



These oscillating cutters are a great tool. The Fein was the first and they held the patent on the technology until just several years ago when a number of manufacturers brought their brands to the marketplace.. The tools can cut through hard material as well as soft or thin metal as well. One of the earliest, if not the first application for this tool, was the removing of casts from broken limbs after they had healed. The oscillating blade would easily cut through the cast material but if the blade touches soft flesh or skin, it won't cut. You can test this by touching your finger to the oscillating blade and all it does is buzz your finger. I wish I had discovered and patented this great idea as I would be sitting in high cotton today.
 

steves

New Member
I bought the dremel version of the tool for $49 on special clearance, it's certainly fantastic to have around!
 

honeykeeper

New Member
[quote name='mcginkleschmidt' timestamp='1311804109' post='161416']

These oscillating cutters are a great tool. The Fein was the first and they held the patent on the technology until just several years ago when a number of manufacturers brought their brands to the marketplace.. The tools can cut through hard material as well as soft or thin metal as well. One of the earliest, if not the first application for this tool, was the removing of casts from broken limbs after they had healed. The oscillating blade would easily cut through the cast material but if the blade touches soft flesh or skin, it won't cut. You can test this by touching your finger to the oscillating blade and all it does is buzz your finger. I wish I had discovered and patented this great idea as I would be sitting in high cotton today.

[/quote]



That's what I was thinking all along........I saw a cast cutter in action eons ago and thought......cool!



[media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HXHFAUNm-c0[/media]
 

honeykeeper

New Member
I removed some front entry steps on my clients deck and built a wheelchair ramp..........then located a second entry/exit with steps on another part to get around to the side of the house easier.



The ramp does have a flat landing as per code making it easier to transition and I like that feature.



Had to re-set some bricks on the path to the beginning of the ramp and I cut some with a skillsaw and diamond blade.......used a garden hose to keep the blade wet/lubed........worked like a champ.



Back on my house when I finish adding the last two decks to get a full wrap-around I'm going with long wheelchair ramps too.....much better IMHO........ <img src='http://www.titanspot.com/Titan/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/004.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':smt004' />
 

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