New Tool Thread

mcginkleschmidt

Active Member
[quote name='honeykeeper' date='31 May 2010 - 06:36 AM' timestamp='1275302180' post='157330']

I came out a lot cheaper at $40..........since I didn't have to buy the hammer drill and haven't needed one since! lol.....


How much $$ was the hammer drill to purchase?




Good use for your tool and noggin mc!




[/quote]



I paid $319 for the drill a little over 10 years ago. I have found many uses for the drill since I bought it. One particular instance came to mind when my son-in-law was installing a metal street address plaque on his new rock mailbox enclosure. His brother had been trying to drill 1/4" holes in the rock with a small hand drill and a standard friction concrete drill bit. He had been drilling on the first hole for about 1/2 hour and had barely made a dent in it. I went home, picked up my hammer drill with 1/4" hammer drill bit and drilled all four holes in about a couple of minutes. It just goes to show, you gotta have the right tool for the job because, otherwise, you're just pissing in the wind. Driving the ground rod with my Bosch rotary hammer drill was operating at just about it's limit in Georgia red clay soil with frequent embedded rock but it was able to perform the task well enough.



The price for the drill is still about the same price today from most retailers but one of the lowest prices I found today with a Google search is from Amazon for $286.55 with free shipping and no taxes.



Below is a copy of my receipt from 21 Mar 2000:
 

Attachments

honeykeeper

New Member
[quote name='krh2' date='29 May 2010 - 05:12 PM' timestamp='1275163953' post='157310']

^^^ Very cool! HK to the rescue again.. But why did you need a ground? HK, I understand... But you dont live on a mtn... <img src='http://www.titanspot.com/Titan/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/017.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':smt006' /> [/quote]



Since he hasn't answered you my guess is he's installing a top secret fossil fueled back-up home generator that calls for an earth ground rod.



I doubt he's installing a new outside hot tub and ground rod........unless he has a new girlfriend he's not telling us about! ....


The new codes require double ground rods at the service entrance of houses or other outside electrical equipment or 16' of buried rod due to increased lightning damage.

I will be installing a new service entrance power meter socket with an outside disconnect tomorrow on a house that had a tree land on it that ripped the entire meter socket and service line off the bungalow/house over the winter. It will require a second ground rod.

My lightning protection system ground rods were 10' x 3/4" and even the Hilti couldn't drive some of them all the way in the rock here.



What say ye mc?.......
 

mcginkleschmidt

Active Member
[quote name='krh2' date='29 May 2010 - 04:12 PM' timestamp='1275163953' post='157310']

^^^ Very cool! HK to the rescue again.. But why did you need a ground? HK, I understand... But you dont live on a mtn... <img src='http://www.titanspot.com/Titan/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/017.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':smt006' />

[/quote]



[quote name='honeykeeper' date='31 May 2010 - 10:33 PM' timestamp='1275359606' post='157334']

Since he hasn't answered you my guess is he's installing a top secret fossil fueled back-up home generator that calls for an earth ground rod.



I doubt he's installing a new outside hot tub and ground rod........unless he has a new girlfriend he's not telling us about! ....




What say ye mc?.......


[/quote]



I thought I had already answered this but perhaps I previewed my post but failed to add my reply. I wish that I could answer your question with some really sexy and elaborate but I'm simply putting in a short section of electric fence, about 24-30 feet long. The electric fence requires a ground rod.



Perhaps I should have said nothing so you could conjure up images of me in a hot tub or running an over-sized vibrator for a hot babe. <img src='http://www.titanspot.com/Titan/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/003.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':smt003' />
 

honeykeeper

New Member
[quote name='mcginkleschmidt' date='01 June 2010 - 11:28 PM' timestamp='1275445720' post='157357']

I thought I had already answered this but perhaps I previewed my post but failed to add my reply. I wish that I could answer your question with some really sexy and elaborate but I'm simply putting in a short section of electric fence, about 24-30 feet long. The electric fence requires a ground rod.



Perhaps I should have said nothing so you could conjure up images of me in a hot tub or running an over-sized vibrator for a hot babe. <img src='http://www.titanspot.com/Titan/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/003.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':smt006' /> [/quote]



Rats........now tell the truth!....




Now I'm going to have to show the new tool I bought myself for mothers day.........and it's SEXY!.....lol.......
 

mcginkleschmidt

Active Member
[quote name='honeykeeper' date='02 June 2010 - 06:53 AM' timestamp='1275476009' post='157359']



Now I'm going to have to show the new tool I bought myself for mothers day.........and it's SEXY!.....lol.......


[/quote]



You bought yourself a new tool for mother's day?????? I guess that makes you a "mutha" as commonly spoken in the vernacular! <img src='http://www.titanspot.com/Titan/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/003.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':smt006' />
 

honeykeeper

New Member
[quote name='mcginkleschmidt' date='02 June 2010 - 10:37 AM' timestamp='1275485876' post='157362']

You bought yourself a new tool for mother's day?????? I guess that makes you a "mutha" as commonly spoken in the vernacular! <img src='http://www.titanspot.com/Titan/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/003.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':smt003' /> [/quote]



I have yet to take pictures of my purchase but I will soon.



Meanwhile I have taken the next step for wine production and had a custom 15 gallon oak wine keg manufactured......it's medium charred inside for a medium to deep taste enhancement as I desire in my wine......"deep-dark-red-oakey" is what I love in a wine.

Until I am able to drink from my efforts you now know what to buy me should you feel inclined! lol....
 

Attachments

mcginkleschmidt

Active Member
[quote name='honeykeeper' date='01 July 2010 - 09:55 AM' timestamp='1277992539' post='157628']

I have yet to take pictures of my purchase but I will soon.



Meanwhile I have taken the next step for wine production and had a custom 15 gallon oak wine keg manufactured......it's medium charred inside for a medium to deep taste enhancement as I desire in my wine......"deep-dark-red-oakey" is what I love in a wine.

Until I am able to drink from my efforts you now know what to buy me should you feel inclined! lol....


[/quote]



Very interesting, I just took my annual trip back to Virginia where I was reared. I have been looking for a 1/2 whiskey barrel for years for a planter. A friend of mine found one and bought it at Southern States store and delivered it to me at our homecoming that we attend each year. Upon my return to Georgia, I filled the 1/2 barrel with water to swell it as it was as loose as the goose in the dried, dehydrated state.



As I was writing this, I was reminded of a time back in the early 60s when an acquaintance of mine traveled to Winchester, VA, the apple capitol of Virginia, and returned with a 50 gallon oak wooden barrel (unburned) full of hard apple cider. The cider barrel had a faucet installed at the bottom end of the barrel that allowed for easy sampling and vessel filling. That was the best apple cider I have ever tasted and it would give you a pretty good buzz. I don't believe one can any longer legally buy apple cider that hasn't been pasteurized and is therefore not amenable for fermentation into hard cider.



I'm not a big wine aficionado but it sounds like a great project if you like wine. Drink up! <img src='http://www.titanspot.com/Titan/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/023.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':smt003' />
 

mcginkleschmidt

Active Member
[quote name='DClights' timestamp='1243982478' post='148527']

well I know me and others(Krh2) will want pics of this. But for now I will settle for knowing what your building??

[/quote]



Well, it has taken me a while to respond to DC's request but now I have something to show. As a bit of background, I'm building (now largely built) a retaining wall to direct water from my neighbor's gutter toward our backyards at the property line. As things stand now, all of my neighbor's rainwater runs downhill onto my property. When finished, when my neighbor's rainwater hits my property line it will become necessary for water to run uphill in order to come across my property line as the grade from my house will slope toward the mutual property line.



Before the wall footing was installed, a 4" PVC Sch. 40 underground line was installed and stubbed to run under the footing to drain water from the underground drainage system that will shortly be installed along the wall footing. In fact, the foundation drainage is the very next phase of the project to be tackled.



The horizontal 2x4 walers will see a second life as an 8' x 12' backyard storage building.



Once this project is nearer to completion, I will install a privacy fence along the property line to mask my neighbor's Sanford & Son collection.



The wall side (my side) and top and will be veneered with Tennessee Field Stone (note left side of photo #1)



This has been a long project but every form was custom built from scratch with 3/4" plywood and 2x4s and every nail driven and every ounce carried was performed only by your's truly. The two concrete line pump guys and my son-in-law running the concrete vibrator was the first outside help used so far in this project. The effort made a lot of sweat happen during the months of July and August this year. The two guys with the concrete line pump said my wall forms were the best looking forms either had ever seen before. It makes me feel as if I might be doing something right.



















 

honeykeeper

New Member
[font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"][font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"][font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"][font="verdana, tahoma, helvetica"][font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"]

DELETE~!!!~
 

honeykeeper

New Member
Got some new tools.......another Makita because of the QUALITY....
..MAC700 Big Bore 2 hp portable oil type air compressor.




All shipped to my gate for $189.49......




This is a great portable and first time air compressor buy for small jobs, filling tires, cleaning tools with the blow tip, small air tools etc.





[font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"]INCLUDES:

[font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"][font="verdana, tahoma, helvetica"][font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"][font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"]
  • Compressor Oil (181122-A)
  • 2 ea. 1/4" Universal Quick Coupler (447013-E)
Motor 2.0 HP Pump Oil-Lubricated Tank (gal.) 2.6 "Hot Dog" Performance (cfm) 90 PSI 3.3 40 PSI 3.8 Maximum Pressure (PSI) 130 AMPS 12.4 Noise Level (dB) 80 Dimensions (LxWxH) 18" x 10" x 22" Net Weight (lbs.) 52.0 Shipping Weight (lbs.) 60.5 UPC Code 088381-053525
[font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"]



[font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"]



[font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"][font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"][font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"][font="verdana, tahoma, helvetica"][font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"][font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"]Low Noise, Low AMP Draw and High Output
  • Cast iron pump with Big Bore™ cylinder and piston is engineered to provide faster recovery time for improved performance
  • Powerful 2.0 HP 4-Pole motor produces 3.3 CFM at 90 PSI for increased productivity
  • Pump runs at lower RPM (1,720) resulting in lower noise (80dB) and improved pump durability
  • Low AMP draw reduces incidences of tripped breakers at start-up

  • Pump is oil-lubricated for cooler running temperatures and reduced wear
  • Roll-bar Handle - For portability and additional protection
  • Large automotive style industrial air filter for increased air intake and greater efficiency
  • Durable cast iron cylinder reduces wear and increases pump life; removable for easy maintenance
  • Oil sight glass for fast, easy and efficient maintenance
  • Lever handle ball valve - tank drain valve improves upon standard petcock design for easier maintenance
  • Built-in thermal overload for additional motor protection



[media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R2Gtyi9xP44[/media]

 

Attachments

mcginkleschmidt

Active Member
The Makita air compressor looks good Keeper. I like the small compact profile and the cast iron construction sounds like a good tough unit.



I have a Campbell Hausfield 20 gallon, 3 1/2 HP, electric air compressor that I purchased about 15-20 years ago that I use for many odd projects, spray paint, spray popcorn ceiling on drywall, pump up tires, nail guns, and other various pin nailers. I've even used my compressor for sandblasting but it maxes out at 6.1 cubic ft./min at 90 psi so sandblasting is slow going but with patience and for very small jobs it is doable. You sandblast for a few seconds, wait for the compressor to pump back up to pressure and then blast for a few more seconds. I've never used my compressor for air driven impact wrenchs but I imagine I would have the same problem with them as I have with sandblasting. For that reason, I've never purchased any air driven impact wrench guns..



My compressor pulls 15 amps and so there are only a few selective outlets I can use without repeatedly tripping my circuit breakers.



I've often thought about getting a smaller, more compact and portable compressor that would be more than adequate for most of my needs but I just don't have the room necessary to store many more tools.



But, I really like the looks and compactness of your new compressor and I wish I had one just like it. The only Makita tool I ever owned was a cordless drill that fell off an 8 foot step ladder on to a concrete floor and the handle broke off. I still have the Makita cordless drill, do you want to buy it? I don't have anything against Makita, I just happened to purchase other brands when I bought tools.



What your next tool addition? <img src='http://www.titanspot.com/Titan/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/003.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':smt001' />
 

krh2

Administrator
[quote name='mcginkleschmidt' timestamp='1298848318' post='160083']

The Makita air compressor looks good Keeper. I like the small compact profile and the cast iron construction sounds like a good tough unit.



I have a Campbell Hausfield 20 gallon, 3 1/2 HP, electric air compressor that I purchased about 15-20 years ago that I use for many odd projects, spray paint, spray popcorn ceiling on drywall, pump up tires, nail guns, and other various pin nailers. I've even used my compressor for sandblasting but it maxes out at 6.1 cubic ft./min at 90 psi so sandblasting is slow going but with patience and for very small jobs it is doable. You sandblast for a few seconds, wait for the compressor to pump back up to pressure and then blast for a few more seconds. I've never used my compressor for air driven impact wrenchs but I imagine I would have the same problem with them as I have with sandblasting. For that reason, I've never purchased any air driven impact wrench guns..



My compressor pulls 15 amps and so there are only a few selective outlets I can use without repeatedly tripping my circuit breakers.



I've often thought about getting a smaller, more compact and portable compressor that would be more than adequate for most of my needs but I just don't have the room necessary to store many more tools.



But, I really like the looks and compactness of your new compressor and I wish I had one just like it. The only Makita tool I ever owned was a cordless drill that fell off an 8 foot step ladder on to a concrete floor and the handle broke off. I still have the Makita cordless drill, do you want to buy it? I don't have anything against Makita, I just happened to purchase other brands when I bought tools.



What your next tool addition? <img src='http://www.titanspot.com/Titan/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/003.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':smt001' />

[/quote]

My CH 26 gallon 2 piston oiled compressor pulled 15 amps too. Used to dim the house lights starting up. Not now. I re-wired the motor for 220. Now it only pulls 4 amps & runs much more efficient.



 

honeykeeper

New Member
Go back to post # 126 to see what I was getting into.............




and I got a real corker machine for me wine.....lol....it compresses....or I do......the cork before ramming it into the bottle.....I fill and cork 6 bottles at a time....

not bad for one old mountain man! lol.....




Oh.....I filled the 15 gallon keg twice with merlot and now it has cabernet getting "oaked"........








I'm bottling in clear bottles because after 4 rackings me wine is real purrrrrrrrrrrrrrrdy! lol....




 

Attachments

steves

New Member
I bought a new impact gun after the plastic trigger on my Craftsman broke. Buddy of mine who works at a NAPA store reccomended it.

900ft/lbs at 4.5 CFM should get the job done :D



 

DClights

New Member
MCG I just saw your post there a few months late. I must apologize. I am quite impressed those forms far out do what I have ever built or worked with. I am also impressed with the curvature that the forms have and the extensive amount of work you did by yourself. I have never seem a concrete pump quite that small all the ones I have are truck mounted units. But all very impressive.
 

mcginkleschmidt

Active Member
[quote name='DClights' timestamp='1310169781' post='161258']

MCG I just saw your post there a few months late. I must apologize. I am quite impressed those forms far out do what I have ever built or worked with. I am also impressed with the curvature that the forms have and the extensive amount of work you did by yourself. I have never seem a concrete pump quite that small all the ones I have are truck mounted units. But all very impressive.

[/quote]



DC, is this the first you've seen of the post I did last year? The concrete line pumping company I used, Jensen's Line Pumping, has truck mounted line pumps but for the size and duration of my job, 7 cubic yards, anything more was overkill. They had had some problems with the pump they used and they had worked on it the day before and they wanted to test it on my job.. They drove a 2nd pump, a truck mounted one, and parked it in the street to take over in case the smaller pump became problematic. The small pump worked flawlessly and never hiccupped during about the 40 minute job.



We used a 3 inch hose with the line pump for pumping a 4,000 psi pump mix with a maximum rock size of about 3/4 inch. The rule of thumb for pump-mix concrete is the rock size should be no more than about 1/4 the pipe diameter. I had a choice of using either 2, 2 1/2, 3 or 4 inch lines but the smaller lines are mostly used for pea-gravel or sand-only concrete mixes . The larger 4 inch line is much heavier and more difficult to manhandle so the 3 inch line was the most practical choice.



I ordered my concrete with a rather stiff 2" slump and we added superplasticizer on the jobsite to give a free-flowing mix with a reduced use of water. The superplasticizer helps to settle the concrete in the forms and around the rebar to minimize voids and honey-combing. I used an electric concrete vibrator that I purchased from Harbor Freight to additionally settle the concrete and to remove the air bubbles. The superplasticizer effect lasts for only about 45 minutes before the concrete in the truck reverts again to its low-slump state, so one needs to work fast.



DC, in the past when you used a truck mounted concrete pump, did you mostly use a truck-mounted line pump or did you use a concrete boom-pump, or sometimes both?



Addendum: DC, the curved forms were made by cutting 3/4" plywood to make the horizontal top and bottom rails that follow the curved footing radius. By gluing and clamping two of the curved 3/4" plywood rails together, you essentially have made a curved. 2x4. The straight vertical 2x4s are placed and nailed between the two curved bottom and top rail 2x4s pf the form. The "skin" of the curved forms were made by gluing with Gorilla Glue and nailing together 3 sheets of 1/4" plywood sheets.



Initially, I was planning to "manufacture" the horizontal walers using the same method I used for the bottom and top rails of the curved forms when I had an epiphany. In the curved portion of the forms, I decided instead to build and build "vertical" walers in the same way the vertical 2x4s are used in the curved forms. This method would be more than adequate for holding and forming concrete that is only 8 inches thick and 2 feet tall. Together with the snaptie system I was using, this method would probably be adequate for build curved walls that are 8-10 feet tall but this discovery and change saved me a lot of work and grief over that of cutting and building curved horizontal walers that follow the same profile of that in the straight portion of the wall forms and waler support system.
 

DClights

New Member
MCg I may well have seen your post but often times like when I am online I am multi-tasking. Sometimes I get lost on another more pressing issue. I have always used a concrete boom pump which is remote control operated. The guy who drives the truck usually has a remote that hangs around his neck and controls the entire machine from somewhere with a better line of communication to the laborers. In my work we also tend to use manufactured forms which are very time consuming in my opinion. Much more so than if you had a skilled form builder with the right tools. But the manufactured forms are more cost effective so that is what we get. In my new job the only time I work with concrete anymore is when we are re-plugging an abandoned oil well and a pump truck is called in to pump that concrete sometimes as deep as 340 feet.



Sadly I do less labor and hands on work then I have done in the past and instead monitor those who do yet I get paid better. I will never understand that logic. So for now no tool buying for me but the tools I have will come in handy in the future I am sure.
 
Top