New Tool Thread

krh2

Administrator
[quote name='honeykeeper' post='149722' date='Jun 22 2009, 05:31 AM']Thanks kev....it was fun and reminded me of building on the boats!









Thank you sir mc.........yep....used a very small bead of clear silicone around the outside perimeter and the folks asked if they could take the table if they move..I said sure you can cut the silicone away with fishing line and lift the top off... <img src='http://www.titanspot.com/Titan/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/004.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':smt003' />



Dog bowls are definately moving....that's where the seating/storage system is going I'm building next. Gotta move two outlets too.



The owner helped me carry the goods up the stairs........I always try to get the owner involved with some part of the process other than writing the check... <img src='http://www.titanspot.com/Titan/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/009.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':smt003' /> <img src='http://www.titanspot.com/Titan/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/001.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':smt003' />[/quote]





[quote name='honeykeeper' post='150174' date='Jun 30 2009, 07:16 PM']Got back to the jobsite today and framed the seating/storage system........hope to get it done tomorrow and go to the bank.... <img src='http://www.titanspot.com/Titan/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/001.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':smt003' />

The darn owner came and vacumed the mess I made before I could get a pic. of it in the house and back porch!.... <img src='http://www.titanspot.com/Titan/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/005.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':smt003' />[/quote]





I love chit like this! Thanks Tom... <img src='http://www.titanspot.com/Titan/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/004.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':smt003' />
 

steves

New Member
New tools?



I got an air nailer kit over the weekend.



Bostich 16g finish nailer, 18g brad nailer, and 18g stapler with a 6 gallon compressor.



I had a brad nailer already, but the kit was still cheaper to get the finish nailer and the stapler than to buy them on their own!
 

honeykeeper

New Member
[quote name='krh2' post='150177' date='Jun 30 2009, 10:54 PM']I love chit like this! Thanks Tom... <img src='http://www.titanspot.com/Titan/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/004.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':smt003' />[/quote]



Well I finished the job exactly on schedule.........even got paid and had dinner at the clients house!........ <img src='http://www.titanspot.com/Titan/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/001.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':smt002' />

All the plywood is double layered.......1/2" over 1/2" = 1" thick...glued-screwed and tattooed. They plan to paint the bench black...and get a custom 3 part cushion made I designed for them....oh yea...I used to sew and make sails and canvas goodies too back in the boat days.

Headed to Montreat at Billy Graham land this morning for the next job......closer to home!

Gotta catch up with the new tool reports! ........ <img src='http://www.titanspot.com/Titan/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/003.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':smt002' />
 

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DClights

New Member
Well yesterday I went into lowes and bought a bosch 7.5 amp hammer drill for work/school. They call it the bosch bulldog hammer drill. It was a big drill but by no means any kind of large contractor concrete drill. Well I paid no attention to the packaging got it home last night and checked it all out and I notice the funny chuck. I thought that bosch had made some kind of monopoly on drill bits til I went back to lowes and found that this bit system is pretty popular amongst the big concrete contractors. Well it turns out that dewalt, bosch and a few others came out with what is known as a SDS, SDS +, SDS max (SDS means slotted drive shaft). Well this SDS shaft is much larger and it is triangularly shaped so that the average bit for a regular drill is too small and the wrong shape. Well lowes and the local hardware stores do not know what an SDS bit is so I decided since I could not gaurantee that I would always find these bits available that I had better get a different drill. So I returned the bulldog and bought a smaller 8.5 amp hammerdrill. Plus two sets of masonry bits of varying sizes. So I was finally able to use the drill around the frat house today to get a TV shelf for a buddy into the wall. It works great.



the first pic is of the drill I ended up buying the second is the one I bought first with the SDS bit.
 

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honeykeeper

New Member
[quote name='DClights' post='152341' date='Aug 30 2009, 09:04 PM']Well yesterday I went into lowes and bought a bosch 7.5 amp hammer drill for work/school. They call it the bosch bulldog hammer drill. It was a big drill but by no means any kind of large contractor concrete drill. Well I paid no attention to the packaging got it home last night and checked it all out and I notice the funny chuck. I thought that bosch had made some kind of monopoly on drill bits til I went back to lowes and found that this bit system is pretty popular amongst the big concrete contractors. Well it turns out that dewalt, bosch and a few others came out with what is known as a SDS, SDS +, SDS max (SDS means slotted drive shaft). Well this SDS shaft is much larger and it is triangularly shaped so that the average bit for a regular drill is too small and the wrong shape. Well lowes and the local hardware stores do not know what an SDS bit is so I decided since I could not gaurantee that I would always find these bits available that I had better get a different drill. So I returned the bulldog and bought a smaller 8.5 amp hammerdrill. Plus two sets of masonry bits of varying sizes. So I was finally able to use the drill around the frat house today to get a TV shelf for a buddy into the wall. It works great.



the first pic is of the drill I ended up buying the second is the one I bought first with the SDS bit.[/quote]



Nice tool for small to medium jobs. Bosch tools are good ones. Register online and you might get $1,500 worth of Bosch tools/accessories.... <img src='http://www.titanspot.com/Titan/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/001.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':smt003' />
 

mcginkleschmidt

Active Member
I own the Bosch variable speed hammer drill, the Bosch 11236VS, a 7.5amp 1 & 1/2 inch. I use the SDS plus slotted bits and I really love them. It it really easy to change bits quickly by pulling back on the chuck head by hand, pull the bit out and stick another bit in its place. there is no chuck to loosen or tighten. Quick, simple and easy.



You ask, why would I want to interchange bits quickly? Just recently while boring 1/2 inch holes in concrete slabs (outside porches) outside the perimeter of my home, I recently had to drill holes every 12 inches to inject a gallon of Termidor solution in each hole as a termite barrier around my home. On one side of my house I drilled 65 holes into the slab and I hit rebar on eleven of the holes. When drilling concrete and you hit rebar, you must immediately swap your concrete boring bit to a rebar cutting bit. The rebar cutting bit only uses the twist action for cutting and not the hammer action. So when you change from a concrete boring bit to a rebar cutting bit, you must change out the bit and change the bit action to twist only. When the rebar is cut through, you must change back to the concrete boring bit and change back to a combination of twist and hammer action. The SDS plus bit makes the bit changing a simple, fast and easy process.



The other thing I like about my Bosch 11236VS is it has three modes, twist only, hammer only, and the combination of twist and hammer. The hammer-only action is useful for breaking up concrete and this drill is quite good at it but it is not for large jobs. It is not a tool to be used all day for breaking. The SDS type drill bits with a flat or pointed head are used for breaking. No loosening or tightening of a drill chuck is needed, just a pull back on chuck head, pull out or insert drill bit, and release of the SDS chuck head and you are ready for action.



 

DClights

New Member
[quote name='mcginkleschmidt' post='152349' date='Aug 31 2009, 12:25 AM']I own the Bosch variable speed hammer drill, the Bosch 11236VS, a 7.5amp 1 & 1/2 inch. I use the SDS plus slotted bits and I really love them. It it really easy to change bits quickly by pulling back on the chuck head by hand, pull the bit out and stick another bit in its place. there is no chuck to loosen or tighten. Quick, simple and easy.



You ask, why would I want to interchange bits quickly? Just recently while boring 1/2 inch holes in concrete slabs (outside porches) outside the perimeter of my home, I recently had to drill holes every 12 inches to inject a gallon of Termidor solution in each hole as a termite barrier around my home. On one side of my house I drilled 65 holes into the slab and I hit rebar on eleven of the holes. When drilling concrete and you hit rebar, you must immediately swap your concrete boring bit to a rebar cutting bit. The rebar cutting bit only uses the twist action for cutting and not the hammer action. So when you change from a concrete boring bit to a rebar cutting bit, you must change out the bit and change the bit action to twist only. When the rebar is cut through, you must change back to the concrete boring bit and change back to a combination of twist and hammer action. The SDS plus bit makes the bit changing a simple, fast and easy process.



The other thing I like about my Bosch 11236VS is it has three modes, twist only, hammer only, and the combination of twist and hammer. The hammer-only action is useful for breaking up concrete and this drill is quite good at it but it is not for large jobs. It is not a tool to be used all day for breaking. The SDS type drill bits with a flat or pointed head are used for breaking. No loosening or tightening of a drill chuck is needed, just a pull back on chuck head, pull out or insert drill bit, and release of the SDS chuck head and you are ready for action.



[/quote]



should have talked to you about this sds first. I realize the purpose for the system but one bit for the sds at lowes is $6 while a regular bit for my smaler drill is $24. The mean reason like I say is the availability of an sds bit when I am not near a big box store. I know the local hardware near where I was working this summer and the local hardware near school here both do not carry the sds bit. so that is why I chose to buy a smaller drill. We do not pour concrete or drill for rebar hanging at most we just put in tapcons and this drill is great for that so far.
 

krh2

Administrator
[quote name='swarren1' date='13 September 2009 - 03:31 PM' timestamp='1252881064' post='152851']

Question on air powered impact wrenches ... do they have a way to set the torque on them so you don't over tighten the lug nuts? Or is there some type of adapter for this? <img src='http://www.titanspot.com/Titan/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/017.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':smt017' />

[/quote]



Discount tire uses a torque stick (not able to calibrate though)... Costco had a gun designed for us that will only go up to 55 ft lbs. They are around $300 and can be calibrated if they get out of spec. Made the tire guys job much easier. We used to make them finger tighten all lugs then torque...
 

swarren1

New Member
Sounds like finger tight followed by a torque wrench would be the only way to go for the DIY'r.



If all the air impact wrenches had a torque slip clutch, I was thinking of getting one and doing my own rotations ... but it would still be a lot of work, and with the miles I drive, I would need to do it too often.
 

mcginkleschmidt

Active Member
New Nitrogen Gas Cordless Nail Gun Technology From Senco



Back late last year I read about a new Senco cordless nailgun that will be marketed sometime early this year.



This new tool is much different from the current cordless nailguns that use a fuel cell to power the tool. This new nailgun recycles nitrogen gas to drive the nail and the battery is only used to reset the nailer to ready it for the next power cycle. It is an interesting new technology that looks good on the surface. I'm going to keep eye out for this nailer to see how it works in practice. If everything works out on this nailer, I might become a new proud owner of one sometime this year.



Check it out:



http://www.finehomebuilding.com/item/9840/breaking-news-senco-unveils-a-nitrogen-powered-cordless-nailer



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=88BdzOMJTz0
 

honeykeeper

New Member
Snow and Nealley "Split-N-Kindling" axe set.



http://www.snowandnealley.com/



18" x 1.5 lb. mini-kindling axe with Classic Hudson Bay head and leather sheath. 3.5" cutting edge.

18" x 3 lb. mini-maul with leather sheath.

$120 for the set.

Lifetime warranty and made in Bangor Maine-USA.



I bought these hand tools to make small to medium sized woodstove kindling from logs I hand split the first time around with a 8 lb. maul and steel wedge head splitter.

The small size also make them good for camping.

Great combo!
 

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krh2

Administrator
[quote name='honeykeeper' date='27 February 2010 - 07:20 AM' timestamp='1267284025' post='156003']

Snow and Nealley "Split-N-Kindling" axe set.



http://www.snowandnealley.com/



18" x 1.5 lb. mini-kindling axe with Classic Hudson Bay head and leather sheath. 3.5" cutting edge.

18" x 3 lb. mini-maul with leather sheath.

$120 for the set.

Lifetime warranty and made in Bangor Maine-USA.



I bought these hand tools to make small to medium sized woodstove kindling from logs I hand split the first time around with a 8 lb. maul and steel wedge head splitter.

The small size also make them good for camping.

Great combo!


[/quote]



Nice set of axes!
 

honeykeeper

New Member
[quote name='krh2' date='27 February 2010 - 04:28 PM' timestamp='1267302484' post='156005']

Nice set of axes! [/quote]



Thanks kev . I'm going to mount them on the wall next to my shotgun. Never know when I might have to hand-to-hand use them if the shotgun jambs! lol
 

mcginkleschmidt

Active Member
I had a job to do, driving an 8 ft. ground rod into the ground, and I had been thinking about the best way to proceed. I took a clue from a post that Keeper did a while back about using a Hilti hammer drill to drive the ground: http://www.titanspot.com/Titan/index.php?showtopic=501&view=findpost&p=127758



I thought $40 for a 4 hour rental of a hammer drill was a bit steep since I only needed the drill for about a five-minute job. I went up to the Home Depot and purchased the 8-foot ground rod and I stopped at the HD rental center to see what they had. The only ground rod driver they had was a behemoth big enough to drive a 2-inch diameter ground rod so I decided to devise me a method and use my Bosch SDS-plus hammer drill. Days before I had searched the Internet for a SDS-plus ground rod driver but none were available. There were a number of companies that make a ground rod driver for the bigger hammer drills that uses spline and SDS-max drives but not SDS or SDS-plus. However, I did find a post on the Internet where a guy had made a homemade SDS-plus ground rod driver that is posted here: http://www.n4lcd.com/groundrod/ Basically, I pretty much copied this method with a change or two. Below are images.




First I cut the chisel end off of a 10" Bosch chisel bit that I already had on hand. I will need to replace the $12 chisel bit if I have need for it again. I used my angle grinder with a 1/16" aluminum oxide cutting wheel to cut the chisel end off the bit. It took a couple of minutes to cut through the steel bit.







The 8-foot copper ground rods comes with two conical ends.







I thought it best to cut the end flat that I would be using as the driving end so I used the angle grinder to cut off one of the conical ends of the ground rod.








I copied the method used by the guy who posted his homemade method of making a SDS-plus ground rod driver. The diameter of the Bosch chisel bit was 9/16" or 14mm. I wasn't able to find either a 9/16" or 14 mm rubber hose that would have been the perfect size. A 5/8" rubber hose would have been to large and would have made for a sloppy fit so I opted to use a 1/2" size hose which slid onto the 9/16" Bosch bit pretty easy.









Unlike the preferred sized 9/16" rubber hose, the 1/2" made for a tighter fit than desired onto the 1/2" ground rod. I liberally used the lubricating grease inside the 1/2" hose to allow for freer movement of the hose over the ground rod while driving. While driving the rod, I found there was little to no movement of the 1/2" rubber hose over the ground rod so the lubricated 1/2" rubber hose worked well. I differed from the above referenced ground rod driver method by attaching the piece of rubber hose, about 3 inches, to the modified Bosch drill bit instead of to the ground rod. I secured the hose to the bit with a screw clamp







Here is the finished job with the ground rod sticking about 5-6 inches above ground level. I timed the ground rod install and it took four minutes. The first four feet only took about a minute and I thought to myself, this is a piece of cake. But as the ground rod went deeper and the resistance increased, it took about 3 minutes more to drive the remaining four feet into the ground.







Here is my tool, the Bosch 11236VS, that operates in twist-only, twist and hammer at same time, and hammer-only modes. Of course, I used the hammer-only mode for driving the ground rod. I saved a bit of money by using this homemade method and my cost was $1.36 for a foot of 1/2" rubber hose and I may have to replace my Bosch chisel bit if I have need for it again for about $12. Plus, I now have a ground rod driver on hand should I need to drive another rod.








So, now, if anyone else is cheap like me and doesn't want to spend $40 on a tool rental for a five-minutes job, maybe you will find this idea useful.
 

honeykeeper

New Member
[quote name='mcginkleschmidt' date='29 May 2010 - 04:59 PM' timestamp='1275163194' post='157309']

I had a job to do, driving an 8 ft. ground rod into the ground, and I had been thinking about the best way to proceed. I took a clue from a post that Keeper did a while back about using a Hilti hammer drill to drive the ground: http://www.titanspot...ndpost&p=127758



I thought $40 for a 4 hour rental of a hammer drill was a bit steep since I only needed the drill for about a five-minute job. I went up to the Home Depot and purchased the 8-foot ground rod and I stopped at the HD rental center to see what they had. The only ground rod driver they had was a behemoth big enough to drive a 2-inch diameter ground rod so I decided to devise me a method and use my Bosch SDS-plus hammer drill. Days before I had searched the Internet for a SDS-plus ground rod driver but none were available. There were a number of companies that make a ground rod driver for the bigger hammer drills that uses spline and SDS-max drives but not SDS or SDS-plus. However, I did find a post on the Internet where a guy had made a homemade SDS-plus ground rod driver that is posted here: http://www.n4lcd.com/groundrod/ Basically, I pretty much copied this method with a change or two. Below are images.




First I cut the chisel end off of a 10" Bosch chisel bit that I already had on hand. I will need to replace the $12 chisel bit if I have need for it again. I used my angle grinder with a 1/16" aluminum oxide cutting wheel to cut the chisel end off the bit. It took a couple of minutes to cut through the steel bit.







The 8-foot copper ground rods comes with two conical ends.







I thought it best to cut the end flat that I would be using as the driving end so I used the angle grinder to cut off one of the conical ends of the ground rod.








I copied the method used by the guy who posted his homemade method of making a SDS-plus ground rod driver. The diameter of the Bosch chisel bit was 9/16" or 14mm. I wasn't able to find either a 9/16" or 14 mm rubber hose that would have been the perfect size. A 5/8" rubber hose would have been to large and would have made for a sloppy fit so I opted to use a 1/2" size hose which slid onto the 9/16" Bosch bit pretty easy.









Unlike the preferred sized 9/16" rubber hose, the 1/2" made for a tighter fit than desired onto the 1/2" ground rod. I liberally used the lubricating grease inside the 1/2" hose to allow for freer movement of the hose over the ground rod while driving. While driving the rod, I found there was little to no movement of the 1/2" rubber hose over the ground rod so the lubricated 1/2" rubber hose worked well. I differed from the above referenced ground rod driver method by attaching the piece of rubber hose, about 3 inches, to the modified Bosch drill bit instead of to the ground rod. I secured the hose to the bit with a screw clamp







Here is the finished job with the ground rod sticking about 5-6 inches above ground level. I timed the ground rod install and it took four minutes. The first four feet only took about a minute and I thought to myself, this is a piece of cake. But as the ground rod went deeper and the resistance increased, it took about 3 minutes more to drive the remaining four feet into the ground.







Here is my tool, the Bosch 11236VS, that operates in twist-only, twist and hammer at same time, and hammer-only modes. Of course, I used the hammer-only mode for driving the ground rod. I saved a bit of money by using this homemade method and my cost was $1.36 for a foot of 1/2" rubber hose and I may have to replace my Bosch chisel bit if I have need for it again for about $12. Plus, I now have a ground rod driver on hand should I need to drive another rod.








So, now, if anyone else is cheap like me and doesn't want to spend $40 on a tool rental for a five-minutes job, maybe you will find this idea useful.

[/quote]



I came out a lot cheaper at $40..........since I didn't have to buy the hammer drill and haven't needed one since! lol.....


How much $$ was the hammer drill to purchase?




Good use for your tool and noggin mc!


 

nascarjody

New Member
Well I just bought a large cornwell tool box from one of the guys at my work for 500.00. this ia a 2000.00 tool box new. He needed a bigger one & I needed to up grade. I dont have any pics yet but will have them up soon.
 
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